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Jumbo Package: NCAA approves training camp schedule

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Your latest Crimson Tide news and notes.

NCAA Football: SEC Championship-Alabama vs Florida John David Mercer-USA TODAY Sports

Happy Friday, everyone. You probably heard yesterday that three more Alabama players have tested positive for the ‘Rona. Like the first five, they are all asymptomatic and the university is saying nothing.

Dan Wolken seems very angry that schools won’t risk HIPAA violations to tell him things.

“I don’t ever foresee us as an institution specifically talking publicly about an individual that has tested positive for COVID,” Mohajir said.

Another athletics director, who asked not to be identified publicly because the school’s policy had not been set in stone yet, said they’re considering just issuing a weekly report on number of positive tests for the sake of consistency and not to raise suspicions that they’re trying to hide numbers whether they’re good or bad.

That’s already been an issue at Alabama, for example, where the BamaInsider publication reported “as many as five” positive cases on the football team. The school later put out a statement that neither confirmed nor denied the report, citing privacy laws.

Poor Dan. For what it’s worth, 88% of respondents to an anonymous player survey conducted by ESPN said that they are comfortable playing ball as scheduled. If the question was posed as “willing” rather than “comfortable” I suspect that it would be even higher.

We got more information on the approved camp model.

From July 24-Aug. 6, athletes can participate in up to 20 hours per week (but no more than four hours per day) of “countable athletically related activities.” Those activities can include up to eight hours of weight training and conditioning, up to six hours of walk-throughs using a football and up to six hours of meetings (film review, team meetings, position meetings, one-on-one meetings, etc.).

Practice would begin Aug. 7 as originally scheduled. That includes a five-day “acclimatization period,” followed by 25 on-field practices.

Those “walk-throughs” are going to be critical for new players.

Jerry Jeudy is looking mighty quick.

Chris Simms probably isn’t impressed.

The Jets have a couple of Tide favorites on the defense.

Williams was best at Alabama when they let him one-gap and get up field. This Jets defense is not built to allow him to do those things, at least not right now. As stated before, Williams was often asked to play his part in the overall defense instead. That often came in the form of stunts, one of which is seen above.

“As a leader, I need to talk to my teammates first, I need to talk coach (Adam) Gase first, I need to talk to the owner first,” Mosley said during an online press conference this week when asked about his plans on kneeling. “I can only speak on how we did in Baltimore when kneeling was the big talk of the town back in 2016, ’17. When we played Jacksonville, we was one of the first teams to fully take a knee. Some guys didn’t. But from that experience, it was on a lot of guys’ minds. Before the game, we was in the locker room talking and crying about the things that were said or how we felt about the situation. There was a lot of raw emotions going into that game. Nobody was really focused on football; we was talking about what was going on.

“At that game, the guys had said, ‘Are we going to kneel together or stand together?’ Guys made their choices. I was one of the guys that kneeled.”

Williams is perfectly comfortable two-gapping, it’s just that he puts up his numbers when he’s allowed to shoot gaps. His get-off is about as quick as you’ll ever see.

Last, this is an interesting factoid.

More than anything, this shows that Mullen has played running QBs early enough in their careers to allow them to compile big career stats, but he obviously has managed to get production from them.

That’s about it for today. Have a great weekend.

Roll Tide.